Cloud Blogs

http://blogs.vmware.com/vmware/

http://blogs.citrix.com/

http://blog.cloudera.com/

http://www.rackspace.com/blog/

https://developers.facebook.com/blog/

http://blogs.aws.amazon.com/net/

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/windowsazure/

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/sqlazure/

http://googlecloudplatform.blogspot.in/

http://googledevelopers.blogspot.in/

http://developer-blog.cloudbees.com/

100 best websites to know and use

BUSINESS + E-COMMERCE

AUDIO + VISUAL

LITERATURE, MEDIA + CULTURE

POLITICS, NEWS + GLOBAL ISSUES

EDUCATION

SCIENCE + TECHNOLOGY

And now, the original list from 2007, created by Julius Wiedemann, editor in charge at Taschen GmbH. While most of these remaining thriving websites, we’ve crossed out defunct websites and added notes when possible:

CURIOSITY & KNOWLEDGE

GRAPHICS, MUSIC & ARTS

E-COMMERCE EXPERIENCE

SEARCHING & FINDING

ONLINE RESOURCES

TOP INTERACTIVE EXPERIENCE CREATORS

CORS – Cross Origin Resource Sharing

  1. CORS – https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/HTTP/Access_control_CORS
  2. Failed request tracing in IIS – http://www.iis.net/learn/troubleshoot/using-failed-request-tracing/troubleshooting-failed-requests-using-tracing-in-iis
  3. CORS and IE – http://www.html5rocks.com/en/tutorials/cors/ [check the first comment about IE]
  4. CORS and IIS – http://www-jo.se/f.pfleger/cors-and-iis . The configuration on the server is also similar to this, and that is why I feel there is something happening in our application
  5. http://stackoverflow.com/questions/3672701/problems-executing-an-xmlhttprequest-from-file-to-http
  6. CORS troubleshooting, good reference – http://evolpin.wordpress.com/2012/10/12/the-cors/
  7. Example code for CORS – http://arunranga.com/examples/access-control/
  8. https://hacks.mozilla.org/2009/07/cross-site-xmlhttprequest-with-cors/ [check the comments by William Edney]
  9. http://stackoverflow.com/questions/916357/why-is-this-xmlhttprequest-sample-from-mozilla-is-not-working-in-firefox-3

Mutual SSL authentication

http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/326574/An-Introduction-to-Mutual-SSL-Authentication

http://www.cafesoft.com/products/cams/ps/docs30/admin/SSLTLSPrimer.html

http://www.cafesoft.com/products/cams/ps/docs30/admin/ConfiguringApache2ForSSLTLSMutualAuthentication.html

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/454048/what-is-the-difference-between-encrypting-and-signing-in-asymmetric-encryption

Blink / Webkit / V8 – everything

Webkit for Developers

http://www.paulirish.com/2013/webkit-for-developers/

http://www.webkit.org/coding/coding-style.html

Blink versus Webkit

http://thenextweb.com/google/2013/04/04/googles-blink-qa-new-rendering-engine-will-replace-webkit-on-all-platforms-in-10-weeks-with-chrome-28/

http://www.theverge.com/2013/4/3/4180260/google-forks-webkit-with-new-blink-rendering-engine-for-chrome

The video has something really interesting – right now, the DOM is in Webcore (which is all c++) part of the webkit. So when we access the DOM in JS Core, it leaves the JS VM to enter Webcore which does involve a cost.

With Blink, Google’s webkit fork, they plan to move Dom implementation to JS engine itself thereby staying within JS.

V8 – Google JS Engine

v8 – http://code.google.com/p/v8/

https://developers.google.com/v8/?hl=it

http://trac.webkit.org/wiki/JavaScriptCore

Simple explanation of REST

A Bit About Basic REST

Source: https://cloud.google.com/resources/articles/google-cloud-endpoints-for-android

In REST, the basic idea is to expose the state of the system as a collection of individually addressable resources. You perform operations by manipulating these resources. A resource is an entity that has a state, as well as a name or id. Resources are stored in your backend—whether that is the Google Cloud Datastore, or something else.

As a general rule with REST, the client sees representations of the resources through requests made to the server. It can also update the resources by manipulating the representations, and sending the updated representations to the server via subsequent requests. Resources may be represented in a variety of ways: XML, JSON, CSV, or more. At this time, Cloud Endpoints only supports JSON, which tends to be less verbose and less vulnerable to human error than XML is.

You may have heard of CRUD (Create, Retrieve, Update, Delete), or variants of it. This is at the root of REST. When you use the Google Plugin for Eclipse to generate an Endpoint class, these types of basic methods are generated in the Endpoint class for you.

You are certainly not limited to those basic actions. Adding custom methods gives you much more flexibility, allowing you to perform complex operations. For example, checkForVictory might perform several queries, plus a write, to a database.

Internet of Things and Semantic Web

The physical web

http://radar.oreilly.com/2015/04/googles-physical-web-vs-apples-ibeacon.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semantic_Web

The term was coined by Tim Berners-Lee for a web of data that can be processed by machines. It extends the network of hyperlinked human-readable web pages by inserting machine-readable metadataabout pages and how they are related to each other, enabling automated agents to access the Web more intelligently and perform tasks on behalf of users.

The Semantic Web, as originally envisioned, is a system that enables machines to “understand” and respond to complex human requests based on their meaning. Such an “understanding” requires that the relevant information sources be semantically structured.

http://www.rfidjournal.com/articles/view?4986 – Clarification by the inventor of the phrase  – “Internet of things”

Nearly all of the roughly 50 petabytes (a petabyte is 1,024 terabytes) of data available on the Internet were first captured and created by human beings—by typing, pressing a record button, taking a digital picture or scanning a bar code. The problem is, people have limited time, attention and accuracy—all of which means they are not very good at capturing data about things in the real world.

If we had computers that knew everything there was to know about things—using data they gathered without any help from us—we would be able to track and count everything, and greatly reduce waste, loss and cost. We would know when things needed replacing, repairing or recalling, and whether they were fresh or past their best.

We need to empower computers with their own means of gathering information, so they can see, hear and smell the world for themselves, in all its random glory. RFID and sensor technology enable computers to observe, identify and understand the world—without the limitations of human-entered data.